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Month: September 2005

SCons: A software construction tool

SCons: A software construction tool

Found on the LightHTTP blog

SCons: A software construction tool

What is SCons?
SCons is an Open Source software construction tool — that is, a next-generation build tool. Think of SCons as an improved, cross-platform substitute for the classic Make utility with integrated functionality similar to autoconf/automake and compiler caches such as ccache. In short, SCons is an easier, more reliable and faster way to build software.

Scriptaculous Lists with PHP

Scriptaculous Lists with PHP

Cool stuff… 🙂

Scriptaculous Lists with PHP

Scriptaculous Lists with PHP

by Greg Neustaetter

Scriptaculous Sortables

Scriptaculous is one of many great new JavaScript libraries created to answer the call for well written ‘Web 2.0’ JavaScript libraries. Written by Thomas Fuchs, scriptaculous has many features that can be used in AJAX-ified applications, drag-and-drop effects, and a whole slew of visual effects. The drag-and-drop effects, most notably the sortables, caught my eye because the look great, they are so easy to implement, and they’re just so much nicer than the standard listbox with up/down arrows that we see in most of today’s applications and administration tools.
SLLists – a PHP wrapper around scriptaculous sortables

So scriptaculous lists are really easy to use and implement…so why put together a PHP script to wrap around it all?

MilkandCookies – Redefined: A Cappella Nintendo Medley

MilkandCookies – Redefined: A Cappella Nintendo Medley

Man, I’m a total sucker for Super Mario performed live. This is a pretty fun medley of video game sound tracks + great skit acting. Yay!

(Thanks, Kevin!)

MilkandCookies – Redefined: A Cappella Nintendo Medley

Redefined: A Cappella Nintendo Medley

Redefined, an a cappella group from the University of Wisconsin – Madison, sing and act out a medley of Nintendo theme songs.

The Wisdom Compendium

The Wisdom Compendium

Another neat site by my buddy Shanti. Check it out!

Update: you’ll have to wait until Shanti get’s the site fully going.
Update 2: go get’m.

The Wisdom Compendium

Welcome to the Wisdom Compendium
September 22nd, 2005
The Wisdom Compendium is a collection of interviews, advice, and, well, hopefully much wisdom that’s being compiled by Shanti Braford.
The compendium was started in late 2005 with the goal of compiling as much sage advice and wisdom from those who I admire and respect. So, why not share the fruits of the labor and allow others to contribute to the effort as well?
Wisdom Compendium Goals
* Interview as many passionate, creative, innovative, foreward-thinking movers and shakers as possible.
* Let them sound off on questions like: What advice would you give yourself if you could go back in time 5, 10, 15 — 50 years ago?
* Release all content under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License
* Translate as much wisdom as possible into as many other languages as possible (similarly licensed)
* Add wiki functionality to allow any passionate Wisdom Compiler to contribute to the repository
* Perhaps one day compile the wisdom compendium into dead-tree format to give to high-school students, college grads, 20-somethings (god knows we need this) and 80-years young grandparents

Sure sign that the apocolypse is near: Slashdot goes to clean HTML 4.01 + CSS

Sure sign that the apocolypse is near: Slashdot goes to clean HTML 4.01 + CSS

Slashdot CSS

So, wow. Slashdot is now HTML 4.01 + CSS. WOW GUYS. Great timing. I’m not sure why they didn’t go straight to XHTML 1.0 transitional, since that’s really today’s standard, even if they’re not concerned about 100% validation (neither am I, for that matter, you have to be reasonable sometimes 🙂 ). Anyways, definitely nice that they’re coming along. /. is basically like the grandpa upstairs, good for listening to stories sometimes, but slow to the chase when you get right down to it.

Sites that I read that regularly beat /. for timely and interesting news and links:

Better javascript debugging through logging

Better javascript debugging through logging

Here’s a more advanced method of doing javascript logging than the javascript debugging technique I suggested before. Check it out! 🙂

This article will introduce fvlogger (available for download here), a library that brings simple logging functionality to JavaScript and the browser.

Logging in JavaScript with fvlogger

Whereas logging packages in the languages listed above provide a complex class/package structure built on top of inheritance and other object-oriented concepts, fvlogger borrows concepts from Log4J and its cousins, but eschews their complexity by providing a simple API and offloading the heavy lifting onto the DOM.

The library defines four basic functions (and provides a few others that can be considered optional), a few flags that can be set to define its behaviour, and several CSS classes that can be used to govern how the log will appear. It requires just one special element to be placed in the document, and including fvlogger in your pages is as easy as adding the following two lines to the head of your documents:

<script type="text/javascript" src="/fvlogger/logger.js" />
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/fvlogger/logger.css" />

Essentially, all fvlogger does is append new elements to a specific element in the document. These new elements contain the logging messages that will assist you in debugging your script(s). The four functions used to create the log messages are: debug(msg), info(msg), warn(msg), and error(msg). Each function expects a single string that will be appended to the document.

Read article: A List Apart: Articles: JavaScript Logging